Antony Gormely’s “Another Place” at Crosby Beach is one of Liverpool’s most recognizable attractions. These spectacular sculptures consist of 100 cast-iron, life-size figures spread out over a mile and a half of shoreline, many of them wading out into the sea. Each of the iron men weighs 650 kilos and is made from casts of the artist's own body standing on the beach, all of them looking out to sea, staring at the horizon in silent expectation. Having previously been seen in Cuxhaven in Germany, Stavanger in Norway and De Panne in Belgium, 'Another Place' is now a permanent feature at Crosby. While the beach is easily reachable by train, it’s easiest—not to mention, quicker—to hop a taxi from central Liverpool.

Food, Spirits & Sculptures: The Many Faces of Art in Liverpool

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When I’m only in a city for three days, sure I feel the pressure to see all the things—but mainly my focus is eating all the foods and drinking all the drinks. I’m only human, right? And Liverpool, from the brief research I had done prior to my arrival, was not hurting when it came to culinary offerings–making three days and two nights not nearly enough for a city with so many booming neighborhoods. But what I really was most fascinated by was the glimpse I was getting into the art in Liverpool, which it turned out, takes on many different faces.

Creative British cuisine in Liverpool from carefully-sourced produce, in Puschka’s funky, pink-walled, parquet-floored bistro.

But I had to be strategic. I’d already had an awesome meal at Titanic Hotel’s gorgeous Stanley Bar & Grill, a nice coffee break at 92 Degrees and a filling lunch at the Liverpool One Bridewell. How was I to round out my final night in the city before heading onto Manchester?

The artistic food in Liverpool

The initial plan was to go to Pen Factory for a three-course feast—only I arrived to find the restaurant closed on Sunday nights. No bother, I’m easily adaptable, particularly when traveling on my own, so I whipped out my phone and opened up the Yelp app. I would not be wasting a meal, there was no doubt about it. After scrolling through several reviews that didn’t seem quite what I was looking for, I stumbled upon Puschka, which had stellar reviews and—bonus!—was just four blocks away.

I showed up to find plenty of tables available and about the most inviting atmosphere you could ask for. I wasn’t so bummed that Pen Factory was closed after I saw what was on the menu. Bacon-wrapped figs to start, followed by a sweet potato and squash strudel as a main? Sign me up! It was all every bit as delicious as it sounds.
Creative British cuisine in Liverpool from carefully-sourced produce, in Puschka’s funky, pink-walled, parquet-floored bistro.

Liverpool’s most famed resident: the gin

The plan for the evening had been to go to the iconic Philharmonic for a nightcap, but I was on strike two when I found out it was closed till the end of the month for renovations. Again, flexibility is key when traveling, and I had heard great things about the Belvedere Arms, so off I went in search of this local watering hole.

It was a bit tricky to find since the entrance was tucked away off of Falkner Street and the exterior of the pub wasn’t marked. I pushed the door open, and it went silent: A dozen middle-aged British men turned to stare at me.

“Uh…are you open?” I asked, a bit tentatively.

“Honey, we’re always open!” one of them chuckled, and then stopped to ponder a) why an American girl was wondering into the Belvedere at 9pm on a Sunday alone and b) why she was armed with a massive camera and photographing her every sip. I guess bloggers are an anomaly in this part of the world!

I sat down and ordered my second Liverpool Gin & Tonic of the day; I’ve been on a gin kick for the past year, and it just so happened the owner of the Belvedere also owns Liverpool Gin, a boutique spirits company that launched three years ago and is just picking up steam in the UK.

The Belvedere Arms is one of Liverpool's most beloved watering holes, and it also happens to be the site of Liverpool Gin distillation.

Even better, but the Belvedere landlord/master distiller, John O’Dowd, happened to be present, and after awhile, we got to talking about his plans for expansion, as well as the history of the pub (John Lennon used to frequent it, apparently; no surprise, as there’s nowhere in this town the Beatles didn’t go!).

One of the most popular watering holes in Liverpool, the Belvedere Arms is not only the former stomping ground of John Lennon, but also the home to Liverpool Gin (and plenty of local flavor, too!).

John was lovely, and I could have spent all night chatting him up. That “quick” nightcap turned into three G&Ts—they make them with Valencia orange and mint or watermelon and juniper berries here in Liverpool; how fun is that?—turned into me accompanying a retired postman, a part-time chef/part-time musician and a horse handler down the street to the Grapes for jazz night. I was tired, it was midnight and I had deadlines the next day, but who am I to pass up a true local’s experience? I’d sleep when I got home two weeks later…

Jazz night at the Grapes in Liverpool

I managed to finish one story at least about 3am after I rolled in from the bar, then woke up at 8 for a special mission of sorts. The one thing I had read up on before arriving in Liverpool that I knew I would not leave without accomplishing was visiting artist Antony Gormley’s Another Place.

I mean, have you ever seen anything so simultaneously cool and ominous?

Antony Gormely’s “Another Place” at Crosby Beach is one of Liverpool’s most recognizable attractions. These spectacular sculptures consist of 100 cast-iron, life-size figures spread out over a mile and a half of shoreline, many of them wading out into the sea. Each of the iron men weighs 650 kilos and is made from casts of the artist's own body standing on the beach, all of them looking out to sea, staring at the horizon in silent expectation. Having previously been seen in Cuxhaven in Germany, Stavanger in Norway and De Panne in Belgium, 'Another Place' is now a permanent feature at Crosby. While the beach is easily reachable by train, it’s easiest—not to mention, quicker—to hop a taxi from central Liverpool.

Seeing the sculptures of Liverpool

That morning, however, the driver I had arranged the previous night didn’t arrive—in retrospect, maybe hiring a cabbie at a pub at 1am wasn’t the best idea in the world (but he swore he’d be there on time!)—and it was getting close to high tide, so I checked in with Brian, the concierge at the Titanic Hotel, and he called his friend Peter to come pick me up. Score!

At 20 pounds round trip, it wound up being less to hire a driver to take me to and from Crosby than it did to take a taxi to the train station, the train out to the beach, the train back from the sculptures and then a cab back to my hotel again. And at a 15-minute drive, if that, I also saved a lot of time, too.

Antony Gormely’s “Another Place” at Crosby Beach is one of Liverpool’s most recognizable attractions. These spectacular sculptures consist of 100 cast-iron, life-size figures spread out over a mile and a half of shoreline, many of them wading out into the sea. Each of the iron men weighs 650 kilos and is made from casts of the artist's own body standing on the beach, all of them looking out to sea, staring at the horizon in silent expectation. Having previously been seen in Cuxhaven in Germany, Stavanger in Norway and De Panne in Belgium, 'Another Place' is now a permanent feature at Crosby. While the beach is easily reachable by train, it’s easiest—not to mention, quicker—to hop a taxi from central Liverpool.

Plus, Peter was so kind and told me to take my time, that he’d be there waiting whenever I was ready. He may have also asked me (nicely) to refrain from getting sandy.

“Oh sure, I’m just going to step out on the sand and take a quick picture or two and then I’ll be back,” I assured him.

Clearly, I’m great at taking instructions. Don’t worry: I did clean myself off thoroughly before getting back into his fancy BMW!

Antony Gormely’s “Another Place” at Crosby Beach is one of Liverpool’s most recognizable attractions. These spectacular sculptures consist of 100 cast-iron, life-size figures spread out over a mile and a half of shoreline, many of them wading out into the sea. Each of the iron men weighs 650 kilos and is made from casts of the artist's own body standing on the beach, all of them looking out to sea, staring at the horizon in silent expectation. Having previously been seen in Cuxhaven in Germany, Stavanger in Norway and De Panne in Belgium, 'Another Place' is now a permanent feature at Crosby. While the beach is easily reachable by train, it’s easiest—not to mention, quicker—to hop a taxi from central Liverpool.
Antony Gormely’s “Another Place” at Crosby Beach is one of Liverpool’s most recognizable attractions. These spectacular sculptures consist of 100 cast-iron, life-size figures spread out over a mile and a half of shoreline, many of them wading out into the sea. Each of the iron men weighs 650 kilos and is made from casts of the artist's own body standing on the beach, all of them looking out to sea, staring at the horizon in silent expectation. Having previously been seen in Cuxhaven in Germany, Stavanger in Norway and De Panne in Belgium, 'Another Place' is now a permanent feature at Crosby. While the beach is easily reachable by train, it’s easiest—not to mention, quicker—to hop a taxi from central Liverpool.

The walk from the parking lot out to the beach took around 15 minutes and started on a paved trail before gradually turning into a sandy path. It had started raining right as we neared Crosby, so I took an umbrella with me that Peter kindly loaned me, then it miraculously cleared as I stepped foot onto the beach.

Antony Gormely’s “Another Place” at Crosby Beach is one of Liverpool’s most recognizable attractions. These spectacular sculptures consist of 100 cast-iron, life-size figures spread out over a mile and a half of shoreline, many of them wading out into the sea. Each of the iron men weighs 650 kilos and is made from casts of the artist's own body standing on the beach, all of them looking out to sea, staring at the horizon in silent expectation. Having previously been seen in Cuxhaven in Germany, Stavanger in Norway and De Panne in Belgium, 'Another Place' is now a permanent feature at Crosby. While the beach is easily reachable by train, it’s easiest—not to mention, quicker—to hop a taxi from central Liverpool.
Antony Gormely’s “Another Place” at Crosby Beach is one of Liverpool’s most recognizable attractions. These spectacular sculptures consist of 100 cast-iron, life-size figures spread out over a mile and a half of shoreline, many of them wading out into the sea. Each of the iron men weighs 650 kilos and is made from casts of the artist's own body standing on the beach, all of them looking out to sea, staring at the horizon in silent expectation. Having previously been seen in Cuxhaven in Germany, Stavanger in Norway and De Panne in Belgium, 'Another Place' is now a permanent feature at Crosby. While the beach is easily reachable by train, it’s easiest—not to mention, quicker—to hop a taxi from central Liverpool.
Antony Gormely’s “Another Place” at Crosby Beach is one of Liverpool’s most recognizable attractions. These spectacular sculptures consist of 100 cast-iron, life-size figures spread out over a mile and a half of shoreline, many of them wading out into the sea. Each of the iron men weighs 650 kilos and is made from casts of the artist's own body standing on the beach, all of them looking out to sea, staring at the horizon in silent expectation. Having previously been seen in Cuxhaven in Germany, Stavanger in Norway and De Panne in Belgium, 'Another Place' is now a permanent feature at Crosby. While the beach is easily reachable by train, it’s easiest—not to mention, quicker—to hop a taxi from central Liverpool.

Antony Gormely’s “Another Place” at Crosby Beach is one of Liverpool’s most recognizable attractions. These spectacular sculptures consist of 100 cast-iron, life-size figures spread out over a mile and a half of shoreline, many of them wading out into the sea. Each of the iron men weighs 650 kilos and is made from casts of the artist's own body standing on the beach, all of them looking out to sea, staring at the horizon in silent expectation. Having previously been seen in Cuxhaven in Germany, Stavanger in Norway and De Panne in Belgium, 'Another Place' is now a permanent feature at Crosby. While the beach is easily reachable by train, it’s easiest—not to mention, quicker—to hop a taxi from central Liverpool.

Once there, I could have used a lot more time than “a few minutes.” Not only is three kilometers—or roughly a mile and a half—on the sand a pretty sizable distance, but every time the sea shifted, the iron men took on a different persona.

Antony Gormely’s “Another Place” at Crosby Beach is one of Liverpool’s most recognizable attractions. These spectacular sculptures consist of 100 cast-iron, life-size figures spread out over a mile and a half of shoreline, many of them wading out into the sea. Each of the iron men weighs 650 kilos and is made from casts of the artist's own body standing on the beach, all of them looking out to sea, staring at the horizon in silent expectation. Having previously been seen in Cuxhaven in Germany, Stavanger in Norway and De Panne in Belgium, 'Another Place' is now a permanent feature at Crosby. While the beach is easily reachable by train, it’s easiest—not to mention, quicker—to hop a taxi from central Liverpool.

Each of the 100 men weighs 650 kilos and is said to be cast from Gormley’s own body. Though they once took up residence in Germany, Norway and Belgium, they’re now on permanent display at Crosby Beach, so you’ll be able to see them at any time you find yourself in Liverpool. And bonus! They’re free to visit.

Antony Gormely’s “Another Place” at Crosby Beach is one of Liverpool’s most recognizable attractions. These spectacular sculptures consist of 100 cast-iron, life-size figures spread out over a mile and a half of shoreline, many of them wading out into the sea. Each of the iron men weighs 650 kilos and is made from casts of the artist's own body standing on the beach, all of them looking out to sea, staring at the horizon in silent expectation. Having previously been seen in Cuxhaven in Germany, Stavanger in Norway and De Panne in Belgium, 'Another Place' is now a permanent feature at Crosby. While the beach is easily reachable by train, it’s easiest—not to mention, quicker—to hop a taxi from central Liverpool.

I had surveyed several locals, many of whom had their own recommendation of timing to go see the statues, but I found out there is no “best time”—high tide or low tide or in between—and it was definitely cool being there closer to high when many of the men were out to sea.

Antony Gormely’s “Another Place” at Crosby Beach is one of Liverpool’s most recognizable attractions. These spectacular sculptures consist of 100 cast-iron, life-size figures spread out over a mile and a half of shoreline, many of them wading out into the sea. Each of the iron men weighs 650 kilos and is made from casts of the artist's own body standing on the beach, all of them looking out to sea, staring at the horizon in silent expectation. Having previously been seen in Cuxhaven in Germany, Stavanger in Norway and De Panne in Belgium, 'Another Place' is now a permanent feature at Crosby. While the beach is easily reachable by train, it’s easiest—not to mention, quicker—to hop a taxi from central Liverpool.

That said, I’d love to have been able to wade a bit further out, so next time, low tide it is!

Antony Gormely’s “Another Place” at Crosby Beach is one of Liverpool’s most recognizable attractions. These spectacular sculptures consist of 100 cast-iron, life-size figures spread out over a mile and a half of shoreline, many of them wading out into the sea. Each of the iron men weighs 650 kilos and is made from casts of the artist's own body standing on the beach, all of them looking out to sea, staring at the horizon in silent expectation. Having previously been seen in Cuxhaven in Germany, Stavanger in Norway and De Panne in Belgium, 'Another Place' is now a permanent feature at Crosby. While the beach is easily reachable by train, it’s easiest—not to mention, quicker—to hop a taxi from central Liverpool. Antony Gormely’s “Another Place” at Crosby Beach is one of Liverpool’s most recognizable attractions. These spectacular sculptures consist of 100 cast-iron, life-size figures spread out over a mile and a half of shoreline, many of them wading out into the sea. Each of the iron men weighs 650 kilos and is made from casts of the artist's own body standing on the beach, all of them looking out to sea, staring at the horizon in silent expectation. Having previously been seen in Cuxhaven in Germany, Stavanger in Norway and De Panne in Belgium, 'Another Place' is now a permanent feature at Crosby. While the beach is easily reachable by train, it’s easiest—not to mention, quicker—to hop a taxi from central Liverpool.

After a half an hour, I figured I was pushing my limit with my kindly chauffeur so I started the trek back to the car—well, after one last pose with my new friends, that is. Beach selfies with iron men while balancing your DSLR on a sandy camera bag and trying to get up in a headstand within the allotted 10-second timeframe is every bit as challenging as it sounds conceptually, it turns out.
Gormley's Another Place iron men in Liverpool

Antony Gormely’s “Another Place” at Crosby Beach is one of Liverpool’s most recognizable attractions. These spectacular sculptures consist of 100 cast-iron, life-size figures spread out over a mile and a half of shoreline, many of them wading out into the sea. Each of the iron men weighs 650 kilos and is made from casts of the artist's own body standing on the beach, all of them looking out to sea, staring at the horizon in silent expectation. Having previously been seen in Cuxhaven in Germany, Stavanger in Norway and De Panne in Belgium, 'Another Place' is now a permanent feature at Crosby. While the beach is easily reachable by train, it’s easiest—not to mention, quicker—to hop a taxi from central Liverpool.

Peter wound up making my last day in Liverpool an amazing one—once he dropped me back off at the hotel, it was time to hightail it to the train station for my trip to Manchester.

Antony Gormely’s “Another Place” at Crosby Beach is one of Liverpool’s most recognizable attractions. These spectacular sculptures consist of 100 cast-iron, life-size figures spread out over a mile and a half of shoreline, many of them wading out into the sea. Each of the iron men weighs 650 kilos and is made from casts of the artist's own body standing on the beach, all of them looking out to sea, staring at the horizon in silent expectation. Having previously been seen in Cuxhaven in Germany, Stavanger in Norway and De Panne in Belgium, 'Another Place' is now a permanent feature at Crosby. While the beach is easily reachable by train, it’s easiest—not to mention, quicker—to hop a taxi from central Liverpool.

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Art in Liverpool: from food and gin to sculptures on the water

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COMMENTS
  • October 25, 2015

    Interesting to see that these statues are anatomically correct 😛 … great pics!

  • October 26, 2015

    Haha in the last three pictures you look quite a bit sandy 😉 I love these kind of beach exhibitions; when I lived in Edinburgh they put up slot machines and in Holland they have the occasional sand statues standing around. Great post!

  • October 26, 2015
    Marie

    Great post. I sure will have my own exhibition when I got a chance to visit this place. How about jumping over the head of the statue? LOL. Awesome!

  • October 26, 2015

    I didn’t make it to the beach! Someone suggested it to me when I was in Liverpool in June, but I was traveling with my mom and I promised her as many Beatles-themed activities as possible. If we’d had one more day, though, I totally would have gone to the beach to see the iron men! Such a cool installation.

  • October 27, 2015
    Jenny

    Haha, I have lived in Liverpool for five years and it seems like you did more in three days than I have done in my time here. Great article!

    • February 20, 2020

      Lol…the things you do for a photo hey?! I’m impressed at managing the headstand in shot, in focus and all within 10 seconds. Brill!
      I love Crosby Beach and the iron men are fab! I am still to time a trip with near to high tide to see a lot of them mostly submerged. I always seem to hit there at low tide! Must actually consult a tide timetable next time, lol…

      • February 20, 2020

        Ha, thanks Tilly Jane! I’m dying to return to Liverpool with my husband in tow. We’re big supporters of the arts and have started our own public art program in the years since this trip, and I know he would love it as much as I did. I lucked out with the tides, for sure!

        • February 24, 2020

          Ah brill – what is your art program all about? Have you got details about it – I’m intrigued. Hope you make it back to our neck of the woods again. I live about half way between Liverpool and Manchester, so very easy to get to both places, and Crosby Beach is one of my favourite beaches nearby.

  • October 27, 2015

    Love that you asked the cabbie to just wait for you! And now I really want to go to this beach!

  • October 27, 2015
    John V

    Great blogs.
    Glad you liked our little city. How did you know to include so many of our favourite haunts in your blogs? 😉
    When you have all this on your doorstep you don’t need to travel (but it doesn’t stop us!)
    Be careful though if you come back to ‘Another Place’ at low water there are treacherous sinking sands if you go further out…..

  • October 28, 2015

    Ok, embarrassed but after living in the UK for 2 years, I still haven’t made it up to Liverpool. Bad. Bad. Thanks for the series – I think that the city probably doesn’t get the attention it deserves, and I need to now get my butt in gear!

  • October 28, 2015

    What a wonderful testimonial of our great ‘City of Liverpool’ Thank you for sharing your amazing pictures of so many iconic places. I love the way you have captured the elegance and historical architecture of the Anglican Cathedral (The place in which I had the pleasure of attending my graduation ceremony in 2004) It is a refreshing change toread such a positive and complimentary review of Liverpool (Scousers will be proud of this)

    Chris

  • October 30, 2015

    Love the pics. Never knew about these guys (uh, the Iron guys not the Beatles). Putting them on my bucket list!

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